Archive for November, 2018

At first glance it is hard to believe Goldfield, Colorado once boasted a population of over 3,500 residents when the nearby Portland Mine provided ample employment opportunities around 1900.

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The Portland Mine at Goldfield in its prime around 1900

The ebb and flow of mining is a brutal life of boom and bust, in Goldfield, as in nearly every mining town and camp in the West, the ore played out that coupled with the Federal Government abandoning the gold standard, the town withered and faded away. Today, Goldfield still struggles to hang on, a handful of residents, some retired, some weekenders, some descendants of earlier miners, and a smattering of coyotes, deer, and foxes still occupy a number of homes in this boom and bust town.

 

Newmont Gold is reworking the tailings piles from yesteryear nearby, as well as carrying out new large-scale mining operations which has also brought a few folks back to town, but for the most part, Goldfield is fragile, wind-blown remnant of a forgotten era. The splintered wood and cracked cornices, peeled paint, and shifting foundations stand today as silent witnesses of grander times in Goldfield. The highlight of the town in the City Hall and fire station, built in 1899, which stands guard over the town, its weathered and flaking yellow paint an ode the gold that once brought life to this great Colorado ghost town.

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Preserved in a state of “arrested decay” in recent City Hall, built in 1899, looms over Goldfield

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Another view of the combination City Hall and Fire Station

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Goldfield’s residential streets are a combo of abandoned and occupied dwellings

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A 100-year-old miner’s shack with the Newmont property in the distance, providing work for modern-day miners who rework the tailings piles of yesterday’s mines for microscopic gold which could not be harvested with the primitive  techniques of the 19th Century. Newmont employs hundreds at decent wages, reworking the “waste rock” of 100 years ago.

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A little elbow grease and we’d have a winner!

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A seasonal home in Goldfield, boarded up for the winter

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This beautiful old Ford and the house behind still have lots of promise!

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Many years since a fire warmed the hearth of this Goldfield house

2019 Ghosts of Colorado Calendar by Jeff Eberle $14.99 CLICK HERE!

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If walls could talk

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On the south end of Goldfield is the short-lived suburb of “Hollywood” which was swallowed by Goldfield’s expansion. Hollywood was actually a suburb of nearby Victor, about a mile away in the boom days. Hollywood was soon swallowed by Goldfield when the Portland Mine boomed.

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One of Hollywood’s nicer homes

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On the north end of Goldfield sits this impressive two-story, occupied until recent years as evinced by the satellite dish. This home is where the “suburbs” or “satellite camp” of Goldfield known both as “Indpendence” and “Hull City” was located. Just south lies the Vindicator Mine.

Ghost Town Guide Books and Photography by Jeff Eberle- CLICK HERE!

 

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The Vindicator, a truly impressive structure, photos do it no justice. It is an enormous building.

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A “fancy” house at the old Indpendence/Hull City site

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Close-up of the fancy house

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Home of the mine boss and his family, occupied until the early-1950s

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Another “satellite” camp of Goldfield was Bull Hill where the hardscrabble miners lived in retired railroad cars on the windswept side of the hill.

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With the holidays upon us I wanted to thank all of my followers again for your support and share links to all of my projects with you in case you are looking for some gift ideas.

I have written two Colorado ghost town guide books, loaded with color photos and GPS coordinates which are available by following the links below. Book one covers the “Gold Belt” region spanning the foothills of Boulder, Clear Creek, and Gilpin Counties just west of Denver. Book two covers the “High Rockies” and features sites in Summit and Lake Counties.

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Click Here- Colorado Ghost Towns Travels: The Gold Belt Guide Book $19.99 

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Click Here- Colorado Ghost Towns Travels: The High Rockies Guide Book $15.99

 

I have also written a book detailing the early Civil War era sociopolitical climate in Colorado Territory. This book is the first in a series of three that begins with the earliest pioneers of Colorado and their deep ties to the South. Future books in the series will cover in depth the forgotten story of the Colorado pioneers who served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War,  the final book of the series will detail the legend of “The Reynolds Gang” and the ongoing hunt for their buried treasure.

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Click Here- The Gray Ghosts of Colorado: Book I, The Copperheads $19.99

Finally I offer my yearly “Ghosts of Colorado” wall calendar, featuring 12 months of my ghost town photography.

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Click Here- 2019 Ghosts of Colorado Calendar $14.99

Thank You For Your Support!

I’m a “little guy” with no marketing budget, so sharing this on social media helps me out a lot!

I came across Farley, NM by accident. I was enjoying my last night at the historic Eklund Hotel in Clayton, NM and looking for abandoned places on my map to stop the next day as I took wound my way to Las Vegas, NM on back roads. I saw a speck that said “Farley” which was on the route I’d be taking the next morning, so I grabbed my yellow highlighter and circled the dot on the map. I’m glad I did it is worth the visit. Although I didn’t see anyone in the 20 minutes or so I explored the town, it appeared that a few folks still live there. A host of abandoned trucks of 40s, 50s and 60s vintage were scattered among the forlorn and vacant storefronts of  what used to be Main Street. Numerous abandoned buildings, barns, and homes lined the side streets. A sprawling abandoned schoolhouse of 1930s style laid down a dirt road on the edge of town- I wanted to investigate closer, but couldn’t tell if the road to the school was public or private, so I opted to stay away. Farley was an unexpected gem of a ghost town on the high plains of northeastern New Mexico. Farley sits just north of Highway 412 about 50 miles west of Clayton smack dab in the middle of nowhere. If, for some reason you find yourself in this vast expanse of northeastern New Mexico, take a minute and enjoy Farley!

 

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2019 Ghosts of Colorado Calendar Only $14.99! Click Here!

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