Archive for the ‘Road Trips’ Category

Just in time for the holidays is my latest photo book featuring 96 pages and 140 color photos-

Abandoned Western Colorado- Ghost Towns and Mining Camps of the Rockies

Over the past year I have teamed up with Fonthill Press and Arcadia Publishing to create three books for the Abandoned Union/America Through Time Series. This is the first of my three books in the series, featuring ghost towns and mining camps of the Colorado foothills and high Rockies. My two contributions to the series will feature Southern Colorado and the San Luis Valley,  followed by the Great Plains of Northeastern Colorado.

I hope you enjoy what I’ve put together for the series and Thank You!  ~Jeff Eberle

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Available December 9, 2019 at leading bookstores and online at:

Target

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

Books A Million

Book Depository

Booktopia (Australia)

Prospero (Hungary)

Angus & Robertson (Australia)

Indigo

Herringbone Books (Oregon)

 

Thank You!

I truly appreciate all “shares” on social media, they go a long way for small-scale authors, photographers, and artists who don’t have a big marketing budget!

Just a quick group of photos from my recent visit to Brandon, Colorado on the eastern plains. Brandon was once a stop on the Kansas & Pacific Railroad, but has faded into oblivion. Today not much remains at Brandon other than some grain storage silos, two or three occupied homes, and numerous abandoned houses, businesses, and automobiles. The red brick bank building which is dangerously close to collapsing is the highlight of the town- A concrete vault built into the foundation which once housed the safe is visible in the back corner of the building.

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The bank at Brandon

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Another view of the bank, the concrete vault can bee seen in the back of the structure

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Abandoned business in Brandon

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Some of the many junk cars scattered around the townsite

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a modern grain silo and elevator contrast with a relic home from Brandon’s glory days

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A Quonset hut whipped by the prairie winds housed an old boat

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A close look reveals a building swallowed by shrubs, the antenna tower to the left suggests this may have been a radio station at some point in time

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Another old dwelling in the town

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Where time stopped in Brandon, Colorado

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Brandon, Colorado

My last photo blog about the ghost town of Aroya, Colorado led to a number of people mentioning, relating memories, and asking about Wild Horse- Another small eastern plains town just a few miles down the road from Aroya.

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Storm clouds and high winds welcomed me to Wild Horse in mid-October 2019. The only sign of life I found in town was a American flag flapping proudly and a car parked in front of the Post Office- the only remaining business in this tiny Cheyenne County town. The majority of the remaining buildings, seen here, at Wild Horse sit on the south side of Highway 287.

I visited Wild Horse on the same trip that I visited Aroya, and found a place, much like Aroya, that has seen its best days vanish in the rear view mirror. Wild Horse stills clings to life, though just barely, straddling Highway 287 in Cheyenne County, a little over two hours southeast of Denver.

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These buildings sit on the north side of Highway 287 which runs straight through the center of Wild Horse. A school house built in 1912, and the Post Office are adjacent to these structures.

Wild Horse is a cluster of old storefronts and shops and residential dwellings. With exception of the Post Office, every business and service in Wild Horse are but a memory. A quick drive up and down the streets of Wild Horse reveal that maybe four or five people still live there, but during my visit on a blustery October afternoon, I saw no one stirring.

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The Antelope Bar at Wild Horse.

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Another Shot of the Antelope Bar.

Wild Horse was originally an outpost for the U.S. Cavalry in the late 1860s, named for a pack of wild horses a cavalry detachment guarding railroad surveyors noticed at a water hole in the area. The Kansas-Pacific Railroad set up a section house at Wild Horse to house workers while tracks were laid from Kit Carson to Denver. 

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An old storefront in Wild Horse.

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It is rumored that this  building was the Wild Horse Dance Hall in more prosperous times.

Wild Horse boomed in the early-1900s, having a number of businesses, including a lumber yard, three saloons, a pool hall, a barber shop, hardware store, the two story stone Albany Hotel, and even a newspaper “The Wild Horse Times.” Sheep and cattle ranching, as well farming, and the railroad accounted for the majority of commerce centered at Wild Horse.

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An old postcard shows an image of Wild Horse during its peak years in the early-1900s.

A huge fire in 1917, which started in one of the town’s two creameries when a wood stove toppled off its shoring burned down most of the business district, spelling the beginning of the end for Wild Horse. The depression coupled with the dust bowl epoch of the 1930s further weakened what remained of Wild Horse, then the railroad went under. Today, one hundred years on from the great fire, Wild Horse teeters on the very edge of existence.

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An image taken shortly after the great fire of 1917 which obliterated much of Wild Horse. 

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A few weeks ago I came across some photos on the web of one of the most picturesque two-story stone buildings in Colorado- The Glendale Stagecoach Station and Inn near Canon City.  I had never heard of this station, or the small community of Glendale which once stood near the station.  I had to go have a look at the building and snap some photos for myself, so away I went.

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The station/inn was built in the 1860s, some records say 1861, others say 1867. Either way it is one of the oldest permanent stone structures in Colorado. But is it really permanent?  Also known in the early days as the McClure House, Glendale Station served as a stop on the old Colorado City to Fairplay stagecoach road.

A flood rushed through the town of Glendale in the early-1900s and wiped out everything but the stone station, but it too was heavily damaged.  Silt deposited by the flood made the land unusable, so the town was never rebuilt and the station was abandoned. Since the flood, Glendale station has steadily deteriorated, and, unfortunately, as always, has been the victim of both arson and vandalism.

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Layers of graffiti cover the station today.

Today the imposing stone structure still hangs on, precariously it stands with no roof, no  inner support beams, and the walls are slowly beginning to separate. Even worse, the station is located on public lands in a relatively remote area which is an open invite to vandals who have taken a very heavy toll on the building in recent years. Layer upon layer of spray painted graffiti cake the lower level of the station, evidence inside shows what little wood remains from the second floor joists has been set on fire recently, and the walls show evidence of people intentionally trying to topple the building.

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A quick inspection around the perimeter of the station reveals the old stone well and cistern, now overgrown and easy to miss. Down the hill and tucked in the trees along the seasonally flowing creek bed you can find stone walls and foundations of other structures that once made up part of the town of Glendale. Broken bottles, rusted bits of metal, and the weathered shards of boards and fencing are strewn in a radius about the station.

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Remains of the cistern

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The well

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It seems that the Glendale Station is both cursed and blessed by its hard to access location- If it were closer to any town or major roads, it is likely that funds would be freed up to allow for preservation and an historical marker. But, if it were easier to access the vandalism is likely to be far worse than it already has been, and chances are the station would be long gone by now. It would be a shame to lose such a beautiful and historic place, but it seems there is very little that can be done to save it. So, we watch and wait.

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Just a few snapshots of the ghost buildings of New Raymer, Colorado, a small community a couple hours east of Denver and still home to many. The old service station is worth the trip alone!

 

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Just some snapshots I recently took of the old church at Antelope Springs, Colorado, and the ghost towns of Willard and Keota, Colorado. Fantastic ghost towns and abandoned buildings two hours from Denver, Colorado on the great high plains.

If you enjoyed these photos give us a like and a share with your friends!  More are on the way!

 

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Antelope Springs Church built in 1915, set on fire by arsonists in July 2019.

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Abandoned grain elevator at Willard

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Willard, Colorado

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Two shots of the Willard general store

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Main Street in Keota, Colorado

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Keota, Colorado

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Methodist Church and water tower, Keota, Colorado

 

My 20 best photos of 2018- A little bit of everything, and in no particular order-

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Abandoned Church, Las Mesitas, Colorado

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Twooch aka “Busy Feets”  my polydactyl or “Hemingway” Siamese, she has 25 toes!

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Century House, Golden Gate Canyon, Colorado

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Somewhere in Colorado

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Columbines, near Red Feather Lakes, Colorado

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Masonic Lodge, Victor, Colorado

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Hawk, Derry Ranch Placer, Colorado

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View of the Collegiate Peaks near Turret, Colorado

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Grouse, somewhere in Colorado

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Mr. Campbell’s cabin, Campbell Town, Colorado

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Wild Turkey, somewhere in Colorado

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Hot Rod Hill Climb, Central City, Colorado

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Miner’s Shack, Freeland, Colorado

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Near Rabbit Ears Mountain, New Mexico

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Mills, New Mexico

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La Liendre, New Mexico

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Sandhill Crane, Pecos River, New Mexico

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Along the Pecos River, New Mexico

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Holman, New Mexico

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Moon over the Sangre de Cristos, near Taos, New Mexico