Posts Tagged ‘paranormal’

I just returned from a short but satisfying trip through the San Luis Valley of Colorado and a small chunk of northern New Mexico between Taos and Chama. I was out to snap a few photos of the past- The faces of the forgotten and forlorn buildings of the region- A region still very much alive, but where the past coexists side-by-side with the present.

slvx5

Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico

slv2

Garcia, Colorado

There is a unique energy in this part of the world. I can not describe it, but things just look and feel “different” in some way as you travel down the lonely stretches of blacktop that run the length of the San Luis Valley and North-Central New Mexico. There is something about this area and it’s vast openness and sweeping views, the surreal aspect of the Great Sand Dunes butting up against the jagged snow-capped peaks of the Sangre de Cristo mountains, the Taos plateau and the great defile of the Rio Grande Gorge that rips through the middle of it- This is an area of intense natural beauty and quiet, peaceful, solitude. Some even say this is an area of supernatural or otherworldly energy- Cattle mutilations, UFO sightings, and the “Taos Hum” which reportedly only about 10% of people can hear, are evidence of this theory.

slvx8

Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico

tpx3

Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico

slvx16

Hooper, Colorado

tp10

Along a back road in northern New Mexico

slv1

Mosca, Colorado

slv3

Moffatt, Colorado

tpx2

Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico

book1

Colorado Ghost Travels- The Gold Belt Region Guide Book by Jeff Eberle Only $20!

abq3

Penitente Morada, Abiquiu, New Mexico

slvx1

Tres Piedras, New Mexico

garcia3

Garcia, Colorado

slvx15

Moffatt, Colorado

slvx3

18th Century Spanish Colonial Church, New Mexico

tpx1

Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico

slvx13

Moffatt, Colorado

2016 Ghosts of Colorado Calendar by Jeff Eberle only $14.99!

garcia2

Garcia, Colorado

tpx4

Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico

slvx9

Ranchos de Taos, New Mexico

slvx12

Hooper, Colorado

slvx11

Costilla, New Mexico

slvx15

Moffatt, Colorado

slvx4

Abandoned Church, New Mexico

tpx5

Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico

abq2

New Mexico

slvx10

Costilla, New Mexico

slvx6

Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico

slvx7

Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico

Advertisements

Cripple Creek, Colorado is a fantastic town filled with legends and lore dating back to the gold rush that swept the area in the late 1800’s.  The town, like all “Wild West” towns and mining camps had it’s fair share of tragedy, violence and intrigue.  Cripple Creek even burned to the ground twice, as was rebuilt from the ashes.

Cripple Creek’s history mirrors that of so many other mining towns of the west- Boom or Bust. Good or Bad. For most of the 20th Century Cripple Creek lay dormant, nearly a ghost town, with only a few hearty folks still lingering in town, scratching at the rocks for a few specks of gold, and selling novelty bric-a-brac to tourists passing through.  More often than not the pack of wild burros that roamed the streets of Cripple Creek outnumbered the human types in town.

In the 1990’s “limited stakes gaming” was legalized in Colorado…and by “limited stakes gaming” I mean gold old fashioned gambling.  Cripple Creek latched on to the idea and was reborn through the investment of casino operators and the revenue generated by the gamblers that flocked there on the weekends.

Cripple Creek today is still enjoying it’s rebirth as gambling town, and it has also managed to keep it’s “mining camp of the west” charm. Gamblers and tourists alike flock to Cripple Creek on the weekends, and, on most sunny days the wild burros still roam the sidewalks and streets of town. If you have trouble finding them, just sniff the breeze for a minute or two and you’ll soon know where to look, there’s an old mangy looking white one that is particularly pungent, but he’s real friendly and will let you pet him.

On my last couple of visits to Cripple Creek I have been drawn to a remarkable old house, left abandoned many years ago on top of a hill just west of the business district. It is a beautiful home, even in it’s decayed and neglected state. A testimonial to the craftsmanship of yesterday. It is a sturdy log structure, two stories tall, with two neatly peaked windows on the second floor. The upper level is finished in fish scale shingling, while the lower portion of the home is rough log.  It’s hands down my favorite abandoned house in the State of Colorado.

While working with my latest batch of Cripple Creek photos, I noticed something unusual in one of the photos I took of this exceptional house-

In the doorway, there appears to be a middle-aged or elderly man, dressed in the clothes of the day (1890’s), back to the camera, with hands crossed behind him. He appears to be bald on the top, with hair around the sides and back of his head, and possibly even a long beard is present. He appears to be wearing a 3/4 length dark jacket with high collar, and he is looking slightly to the right and down, as if lost in deep thought.  His impression is clearer towards the right, and fades to the left.

I have visited and photographed  numerous ghost towns, abandoned buildings, graveyards, etc. over the years, but this is the first image of a spirit I can say I have ever captured on film.  I am a believer in the paranormal, but not a fanatic or a preacher of the paranormal- I don’t seek out ghosts and ghost stories, and I don’t try to convert others to become believers.

I have a simple philosophy- I know spirits exist, I have felt them around me in various places and at various times in my life. I leave them alone, and they leave me alone. No one can say for sure what is on the “other side” or why, perhaps, a spirit gets stuck or chooses to stay on “this side”, these questions are best left unasked and unanswered, mankind does not need to know everything.

Below is my photo of “The Old Man in the Door” at Cripple Creek, Colorado, and an enlargement.

Who he is and what he is pondering I will never know, and don’t care to know.

"The Old Man"

“The Old Man”

Closeup of "The Old Man" wih his back to the camera, hands folded behind him, dark coat with collar, looking slightly right and down with beard and balding head.

Closeup of “The Old Man” wih his back to the camera, hands folded behind him, dark coat with collar, looking slightly right and down with beard and balding head.

 

I hopped in my Dodge on a bitter cold morning in early November. Being a night shift worker, I was battling another bout of insomnia, and I decided to hit the road for parts unknown instead of tossing and turning in bed until sunrise.  I rolled east down Interstate-76, and headed for the northeast corner of Colorado. Well before dawn the city lights of Denver vanished in the rear view mirror and I hummed down the highway alone.

The school house is all that remains of Buckingham, long abandoned, the rest of the town was lost to a prairie fire.

The school house is all that remains of Buckingham, long abandoned, the rest of the town was lost to a prairie fire.

Abandoned farm house near Grover
Abandoned farm house near Grover

Grover railroad depot built in 1888

Grover railroad depot built in 1888

Dearfield Negro Colony

Dearfield Negro Colony

Main Street Keota

Main Street Keota

Keota

Keota

http://www.blurb.com/user/Vicha603

 

The second book of my three part series “Life. Death. Iron.” is now available through the publisher (Volume I: LIFE is also available)

“Volume II: DEATH” showcases the forgotten graveyards of the High Plains, Rocky Mountains and Desert Southwest.  Price is $29.99

http://www.blurb.com/b/4894609-life-death-iron-volume-ii-death

deathpv